Bread sales heat up

Lonely loaf
The last loaf of sourdough awaits a buyer Aug. 10, 2016, at the Smittybread booth.

Earlier this summer I was convinced that weather had as much to do with the vagaries of farmers’ market attendance as any other factor, but the past couple of sales have deflated that theory (thankfully.)

We’ve had just blistering weather lately. Even the farmers at the market, who should be used to it, appeared bummed. The heat index yesterday was around 100 degrees, and for the first couple of hours there wasn’t a breeze to be had. The West Lafayette Farmers’ Market, although technically in a city park, is actually in the middle of an asphalt parking lot. The vendors at this market set up between 1 and 3, which yesterday coincided with the peak temperature of 90.

On Wednesday morning, after 7 hours of baking, I had a few minutes of respite in the air-conditioned vehicle before it was time to unload my equipment onto the hot asphalt and do a little baking myself. Despite wearing a loose T-shirt, shorts and sandals, I was coated with sweat by the time my “EZ Up” (anything but!) was set up, the tables were loaded with fresh breads and the first customer had arrived — 30 minutes before the market opened!

I thanked the first-time bread buyer for braving the heat but said the market frowned on early sales. She was a little irritated, but when I promised her I’d save her a baguette while she went to the grocery store nearby, she was fine. The last few minutes before the 3:30 opening I freshened up in the restroom, changed T-shirts, set up my portable electric fan and poured myself a cup of cold water.

croissantsMy first sales of the day were two baguettes, which the Purdue University Extension booth purchased for a food demonstration. I think they made bruschetta, but I was too busy to try any of them. Despite the heat, I had a steady stream of customers for the first hour and a half, at the end of which I’d sold out of baguettes, croissants and pain au levain. Although the pace slackened after that, it remained steady and it wasn’t long before I ran out rye sourdough, seeded sourdough, Lafayette Sourdough and multi-grain.

At 7 p.m., or 30 minutes until closing, I had one loaf left, a 23-ounce 100% whole wheat sourdough made with organic flour, natural leavening, a little salt and a pinch of yeast for insurance. Just for the heck of it I posted a picture of the lonely loaf on my Smittybread Facebook page. Less than 5 minutes later a customer came up and snatched it up. He did not, however, see it on social media. It was pure coincidence.

I set a personal sales record on what was likely the hottest day of the summer. It’s real nice at the end of a hot afternoon to have only equipment left to pack up, although my wife complains when I don’t bring home unsold bread.

It was, moreover, a testament to the hardiness of Smittybread customers, who are true bread lovers. They won’t let a little triple-digit heat stand in the way of sinking their teeth into a loaf of real bread. If any of you are reading this, thanks again and see you next week.

 

 

 

 

 

One thought on “Bread sales heat up

  1. Thanks for posting. It is enlightening to hear all the work that goes into your ultimate arrival at market! The croissants look delicious!

    Like

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